A Travellerspoint blog

A Month in Paris in Winter

Day 19: Art in Amsterdam

A side trip from Paris to Amsterdam is an easy train ride. For me, the primary purpose of a visit to Amsterdam was to see the Van Gogh museum. I have long been intrigued by his life and his art and on a previous trip to France, I went to Arles and St. Remy where he painted so many of his finest works. Of course, he also was hospitalized there after a break down. His short, tragic life ended nearby.

I knew he spent time in Paris and that his brother, who supported him throughout his life, lived in Paris. A few days before visiting the museum in Amsterdam, I found where Theo lived and photographed his door in Montmartre a few blocks from my apartment. Nearby, you can visit the Moulin Galette. There were several paintings in the Van Gogh Museum that reflected scenes from my neighborhood. There is, in fact, a painting called "View from Theo's Apartment" and several paintings of the windmill at Moulin Galette.
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One of my favorite paintings in the Van Gogh museum is of "The Yellow House" which still stands in Arles as a cafe.
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The most moving part of the visit for me was to see excerpts from the letters Vincent and Theo wrote back and forth throughout their lives. I was struck by the beauty of their penmanship and by the fact that they wrote hundreds of letters to one another throughout their lives. Now, we email. Or text. We will never again have such documentation of a relationship, of two people pouring out their lives, thoughts, feelings, to one another.

The letters were published and I have placed them on my "must read" list. What is on yours? Let me know in the "comments."

Posted by teethetrav 11:22 Archived in Netherlands Tagged amsterdam arles letters van_gogh_museum moulin_galette theo_van_gogh vincent_van_gogh the_yellow_house Comments (0)

A Month in Paris in Winter

Day 18: Amsterdam: A Foodie City

A side trip to Amsterdam was packed with art, architecture, canals and other sights and activities. A side benefit, somewhat unexpected, was the delightful, delicious food we found everywhere (and no, we were not suffering from munchies).

In between visits to museums, walking, taking a boat ride around the canals, we grazed our way through the city. Our first meal was at a tiny cafe called Bistro Bi Jons where the chef, a woman, cooked as you ordered, in full view of the customers. No prepared foods, here. As she cooked, the aromas got better and better, which made me even hungrier. The liver,with onions, bacon, and bread was intense with flavor. The soup of the day was filled with sausages, vegetables, and the base was green beans. I need to steal this recipe.
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After visiting a few museums, we stopped and shared a warm waffle drizzled with Nutella. Warm carbohydrates with chocolate and hazelnuts. What else is there to say about that?

For dinner, we ate at a restaurant called Het Karbeel near Central Station, where we were taking the train back to Paris. They, like so many other places in Amsterdam serve craft beers, beer on tap, and have an extensive wine list. We started with a cheese fondue, then I had chicken thighs in a peanut sauce on a skewer. Again, I need to figure out this recipe. Not that we had any room left, but we split a dessert. Crepes wrapped around ice cream, sitting in a sauce, with a dollop of whipped cream on the side.

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I love travel. I love especially travel with fellow foodies who get as excited as I do when they read a menu. DC367A6DD4954D082A3839E64061EB5A.jpg
I will return to Amsterdam at some point for a longer stay. Please comment and tell me some of your favorite places to eat and to go.

Posted by teethetrav 01:02 Archived in Netherlands Tagged beer paris france amsterdam netherlands wine crêpes fondue waffles nutella Comments (1)

A Month in Paris in Winter

Day 17: Amsterdam: Bicycles, Houseboats, & Canals (Oh My!)

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A day trip from Paris to Amsterdam is an easy trek. A train ride takes you through Belgium into this pristine city which looks like it was designed by a type A toymaker. In a good way. Man-made canals criss cross the city. And they were, indeed MAN-made. The founding fathers ensured we would know this by giving them names such as the Gentleman's Canal, the Prince's Canal, and the Emperor's Canal. Be that as it may, a boat ride takes you through most of the city and gives you a view of some of the 1200 bridges. This is a walking city, so walking along the canal is also truly enjoyable. When you get tired of looking at the water, you can glance into the windows on the opposite side and see into the living rooms of the locals. Window shades are not big here, which makes the voyeur in me very happy. I love to see inside homes.

There are way more bicycles here than cars. There is much more of a chance of being hit by a bike than of being run-over by a tram, bus, motorcycle or car; the other modes of transportation. Everywhere you look there are bikes flying past you or parked on the streets and bridges. They steal bikes where I come from. In Amsterdam, it seems it's safe to leave your bike. The big fear is forgetting where you parked it. I have enough problems finding my car sometimes and have been known to stand in a parking lot trying to open a stranger's car, thinking it was mine. How do people here remember where they left their bike and how do they tell them all apart? Leave a comment if you think you know the answer, please.
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If you don't want a typical tourist experience in Amsterdam, you can rent a houseboat for your stay, instead of an hotel room. They dot the canals and are fully equipped with satellite TV, fridge, stove, living room, and all the comforts of home. In fact, some are stationary homes on the canal. Many, though, are true houseboats. Each is distinctive and has a charm all its own. Privacy, however is an issue since you have boats traveling up and down the canals all day and into the night and people like me peeking inside your windows to see how you live.

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Posted by teethetrav 00:23 Archived in Netherlands Tagged canals paris france amsterdam houseboats netherlands bicycles day-trip Comments (0)

A Month in Paris in Winter

Day 16: A Meal in Paris

Eating in Paris is simple, delicious, and fabulous. Each day you can decide whether to cook, purchase prepared foods, or eat out. All options are available within a few block radius. Supplies are purchased on an as needed basis, not for a week at a time, as we in the US tend to do. Each day is an eating adventure.

My son and his wife, the Louboutin fan, left and my daughter and one of her best friends arrived today. Goings and comings in Paris. I took my daughter and her friend around my neighborhood. We hiked up beyond Sacre Coeur, then down past the Montmartre Cemetary. We came back up via Rue Lepic, my favorite market street. Some know it as the street where the movie Amelie was filmed. After we had a coffee at the cafe where much of the movie was filmed we stopped at various shops. On the spot we decided to eat in and put together a wine, meat, cheese, and bread meal. We purchased cheeses at the cheese shop, charcuterie at the meat vendor, and accoutrements such as olives, cornichons, and pate. Of course, we stopped at the obligatory boulangerie for a baguette to round out the meal. With our favorite wine in hand, we headed home to partake a simple, delicious meal comprised of our purchases. Perfect. An all around favorite was the goat cheese topped with figs. But the hands-down favorite was the runny, gooey camembert ("It smells like toes" to quote my daughter) which was so delicious, it left us speechless.
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At one point, my daughter turned to me and said, "You're never coming home, are you?"

Posted by teethetrav 11:02 Archived in France Tagged food paris france baguette cheese figs charcuterie pate Comments (0)

A Month in Paris in Winter

Day 15: Could I Live in Paris?

I got an email from a friend in the USA asking me if I would consider living in Paris. In a heartbeat, I emailed her back. My response? "Oui." I didn't stop to ponder, waffle, consider pros and cons, or think. Wow. That's not characteristic of me at all. I tend to be a ponderer. Sometimes, even a waffler. Why the quick response? I had to consider why I was so sure I would think about moving here.

I've always had a visceral response to France. Some of that is inexplicable. Some, I can explain. In France, people like food and meals. They appreciate sitting at a table for hours with good, simple food made with good, simple ingredients. The food is complemented by the people and the conversation. I have found this in other places in Europe, as well. Italy loves a good meal, good wine, good company, and good conversation. But, as much as I find Italy to be a phenomenally beautiful country, I don't think I want to live there. It's a masculine country.

In France, I feel like women are more respected and appreciated for all of their qualities. France is a more feminine country. Even the architecture is feminine. It is curvaceous, sensual, appealing.

I like that people appreciate art and architecture in France, as well as a good meal. My good meal tonight came from Le Jardin d'en Face on the Rue Trois Freres in Montmartre. It's a tiny place with about twelve tables and a chalkboard menu. I had an insanely good fois gras tarte cooked with an egg on top that was light and impossibly delicious. I followed that with a fresh sea bass, salad, and rice. Simple. Perfect.
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But I digress. What I love about France, and about Paris is there are still bookstores. With real books. A lot of them. And on the Metro, people read those books. Sometimes, they are so engrossed I've seen them miss their stops. I love that.

I love that children eat out with their parents and talk and eat. They don't have tablets with games to entertain them so their parents can eat and not be interrupted.

I love that dogs hang out with their owners and wait for them outside restaurants and sit next to their owners outside at cafes.

I love that history is respected and still discussed. I love that "fast food" is a fresh baguette and real cheese or chicken, not processed cold cuts.

I love that people buy bread daily. And croissants. And pretty much everything else to eat.

I guess the most important point is : what would I miss if I left the US? My family, my friends, some TV shows (don't judge), and...I think that's it.

I have a lot to consider. Stay tuned.

Posted by teethetrav 14:41 Archived in France Tagged paris france dogs cafes Comments (0)

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